Subscription, cheap and free – where do you get bargain audiobooks?

microphone

I previously wrote about how I learnt to love audiobooks. Once you’ve acquired a habit, where do you get your fix? Audiobooks can be expensive. Here are some value and free options.

Subscriptions

Amazon-owned Audible price single audiobooks extremely high – at prices comparable to audio books on CD. That’s because they don’t want you to buy them individually. They want to tie you into a bundle. You can buy them significantly cheaper if you buy the Kindle and the audiobook together on the Amazon website.

What they really want you to do though, is take out an Audible subscription. Prices start at £7.99 per month for one credit (which you can exchange for any book). You can roll over credits or pause your contract if you want to. The best deals are for annual contracts – I have the 24 credits for £109.99 contract, which works out at £4.58 per book. However, with the annual contracts, you are unable to cancel if you change your mind.

With all the contracts, you can return books at any time, for any reason. You could effectively use it as a streaming service, but I’m not sure that would be ethical (it’s not clear how authors and narrators get paid under this model). I have returned a couple of books which I started and didn’t enjoy, and one because the narrator didn’t feel right for the particular book. The return guarantee means you can also take a chance on something new, which you might hesitate to pay full price for.

Audible offers occasional free audiobooks. They also have ongoing offers (some exclusive to subscribers, including a Daily Deal).

Audible in the US has just started offering  Audible Romance, an unlimited “reading” service for romance audiobooks. This is only available in the US and costs $14.95 per month. It includes use of sub-categories for better discoverability (Audible’s search is currently pretty poor, which is why I buy my audio books through Amazon) and the ability to skip to the good parts (!). It will be interesting to see if they roll out the unlimited model to other genres and countries.

Competitors to Audible

Kobo have started their own subscription audiobook service at £6.99 per month, clearly aiming to undercut Audible, and Playster offer an unlimited audiobook service for £14.50 per month (or you can bundle with other products). Single audiobooks are also much more reasonably priced on iBooks if you can bear to negotiate their infrastructure. I haven’t tried any of these myself so can’t comment, however a number of audiobooks are exclusive to Audible which may be an issue for some listeners.

Overdrive for libraries

stack-of-books-1531138-640x480.jpgMany libraries, including my own, offer ebook and audiobook loans via Overdrive. Until recently I’ve been using the Overdrive app which is a bit fiddly but the new Libby app is much easier to use and better integrated with the library catalogue. The selection of audiobooks which are available to you depends on what your library has acquired.

I have found the choice quite limited. I guess this is to be expected. Libraries have a massive back catalogue of physical books but are starting from scratch with audiobook downloads. When I go looking for a particular book, I am generally disappointed. However, rather like going into a secondhand bookshop, the limited selection makes for serendipity and I’ve discovered some great new authors, and have enjoyed some twentieth-century classics that I previously missed.

You can also request books through the app and the requests are forwarded to your library. I have started doing this – of course it doesn’t  necessarily mean they will buy them but it gives them an idea of demand for particular titles.

Librivox

Librivox is a fantastic resource providing audiobooks of public domain works recorded by volunteers. It has a really user-friendly app with good search (including search by narrator, which is particularly useful – see below).

Because the narration is done by volunteers, you find that in some books, each chapter is recorded by a different narrator. There may be different genders, nationalities and accents in a single book. In one classic novel which I started (but didn’t finish), the narrator read every footnote as it occurred on the page!

If you are trying to immerse yourself in a novel, you may find this distracting but I don’t mean to sound ungrateful. It is a wonderfully generous thing for a volunteer to narrate even a chapter. I’ve been dabbling with dictation software recently and realise how hard it is to speak continuously for any length of time.

There are also some fantastic narrators on the site, including professional actors and voice artists, and I’ve had some great finds. Being able to search by narrator means once you identify one you like, you can easily find their other books.

What have I missed? Where do you get bargain audiobooks?

* I have done my best to supply accurate information but things change all the time so please check prices and terms and conditions before committing your cash!

4 thoughts on “Subscription, cheap and free – where do you get bargain audiobooks?

  1. Audiobooks have been the big discovery of my year. I have been particularly grateful for them during several periods when I was bed bound and sick to the back teeth of news magazine programmes on the radio. The Audible annual subscription has worked well for me. I’ve topped it up with purchases from their daily deals and they’ve pretty much always had what I wanted. I’ve tried the local library service but as they are hardly buying any hard copies of books at the moment there is little hope of any real variety there.

    Like

    • I’m hoping that our library’s choice of audiobooks might get better over time, as they see what people borrow and request. It’s a relatively new service. But libraries are under so much pressure at the moment it’s hard to be optimistic…

      Like

      • Oh tell me about it. In the last two years our local library has gone from being open five days a week to just one. Still, I suppose I should be glad it’s still there at all. What really grieves me is that I live in one of the poorest parts of the city, where a library is an essential. The richer areas still have five day coverage.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s